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June 5, 2012 / Stephanie Vermillion

For Beatles fans, Liverpool is as good as it gets.

It’s been almost 14 hours since our Beatles “Fab Four” tour in Liverpool, and I still can’t get “She Loves You (yeah, yeah, yeah),” or actually any of their songs out of my head. But being a Beatles fan myself (I ranked myself a level-six out of 10 fan when our tour guide asked), hearing those songs on repeat while driving from Ringo to Paul to John to George’s childhood homes is well worth the ongoing, repeating mental music.

Ringo’s Mom’s pub, Liverpool, England

Our tour guide began with a little Beatles background history (and since I fulfilled my English requirements with a Literature, Film & The Beatles course in college, I was fact checking the whole time).

Then he took us to Ringo’s childhood neighborhood — both where he grew up and his mother’s pub that he named his first solo album after.

This stop was followed by another stop to the famous Penny Lane, where we learned the poetic

Penny Lane, Liverpool, England

license the Beatles took when writing those lyrics (some of the lyrical mentions may not actually be on Penny Lane, but I won’t spoil it for you)!

We then proceeded to Paul McCartney’s house, where we saw the bedroom window Sir Paul allegedly chose so he could have an easy route to sneak out (whether fact or fiction, I’m not sure, but pretending I know the inside scoop to the Beatles’ lives feels so empowering).

Paul McCartney’s childhood home, Liverpool, England

After being paparazzi at Paul’s house (after last night’s concert, can you blame us?) we went on to John Lennon’s stomping grounds of the ever-familiar Strawberry Fields. During Lennon’s childhood there was an orphanage on the Strawberry Fields property that he could see from a tree in his backyard.

Strawberry Fields, Liverpool, England

Because he was constantly teased at school for an absent father and uneasy family life, he felt more at ease in the company of the orphans, and therefore would sneak over there almost daily (a stunt he got in trouble for every time)!

It was then off to John’s house, where we not only saw the actual room he and Paul were known to practice daily, but our guide also showed us the area where John’s mother had been tragically killed. Apparently Yoko Ono visits John’s house on a regular basis because she can feel his presence in the rooms, which I don’t find at all surprising since his unbeatable talent developed over the years within those walls.

John Lennon’s childhood home, Liverpool, England

We also saw George’s house, but our guide treated this sight just like most of the press treated George in comparison to Ringo and especially Paul and John — with a quick, brief overview. But I wasn’t too mad about that, seeing as Liverpool weather fits all England stereotypes of cold, windy and overly rainy.

And for a fan, seeing all four houses would be more than enough for a life of Beatles satisfaction. But, just as watching the royal family recently has been more than I could have ever dreamed of,

Spot where Paul & John met. Liverpool, England

Liverpool followed suit: we stood in the spot where the magic all began, where (sigh) John and Paul first met. (Our guide told us Bieber had been in that same spot recently, which I completely tuned out as to not ruin the moment).

The goosebumps and chills at this point weren’t from the weather — they were from that moment where years of growing up as a Beatles fan marry the unrealistic opportunity to stand on possibly the most important soil in musical history, which of course is none other than Liverpool.

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